NORTH KOREA MISSILE CAPABLE OF HITTING MAINLAND USA

North Korea missile:North Korea tested an intercontinental ballistic missile Friday that appears to have the range to hit major US cities, experts say.

North korea missile

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A combination of US, South Korean and Japanese analyses of the launch from Mupyong-ni, near North Korea's border with China, show the missile flew about 45 minutes, going 3,700 kilometers (2,300 miles) high and for a distance of 1,000 kilometers (621 miles).
If the North Korea missile were fired on a a flatter, standard trajectory, it would have major US cities like Los Angeles, Denver and Chicago well within its range, with possibly the ability to reach as far as New York City and Boston, according to David Wright, a missile expert at the Union of Concerned Scientists.

South Korea's joint chiefs of staff said they estimate that the intercontinental ballistic missile tested Friday is more advanced than one launched earlier this month based on the range it traveled. Experts had said that test showed Pyongyang had the ability to hit Alaska.

North korea missile

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Wright said that early analysis of Friday's test cannot, however, determine how heavy a payload the missile was carrying in its warhead. The heavier the payload, the shorter the range, he wrote on his organization's website.
A statement from Pyongyang's state-run Korean Central News Agency on Saturday said the latest missile launch was a Hwasong-14, the same missile tested earlier in the month.
Friday's test was designed to show the Hwasong-14's maximum range with a "large-sized heavy nuclear warhead," the statement said.
It said Washington should regard the launch as a "grave warning."
US President Donald Trump condemned North Korea missile launch on Friday.

NORTH KOREA MISSILE

North korea missile

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"Threatening the world, these weapons and tests further isolate North Korea, weaken its economy, and deprive its people." Trump said in a written statement. "The United States will take all necessary steps to ensure the security of the American homeland and protect our allies in the region."
The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Joseph F. Dunford, Jr., and the commander of US Pacific Command, Adm. Harry Harris, called the South Korean Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman General Lee Sun Jin in the wake of North Korea's test to express the US' "ironclad commitment" to its alliance with South Korea and discuss military response options.
Hours after that call, the US and South Korean military conducted a live fire exercise as a show of force in response to the missile test, according to Pentagon spokesman, Capt. Jeff Davis. The exercise included firing missiles into the ocean.